Closing Halliburton Loophole

2
Posted September 1, 2009 by Jeff Prince in Blotch

Local activists are passing along this notice from the Natural Resources Defense Council, which, if successful, could impact local gas drilling:

“Tell Congress to close the ‘Halliburton Loophole’ to protect drinking water from contamination.

“Hydraulic fracturing is an oil and gas production technique that involves the injection of fluids, often containing toxic chemicals, into oil or gas wells at very high pressure.

“Although the Safe Drinking Water Act regulates most forms of underground injection in order to protect drinking water sources, in 2005 Congress passed the ‘Halliburton Loophole,’ which exempts hydraulic fracturing from the law’s reach (the exemption was given that name because Halliburton is one of the companies that provide hydraulic fracturing services). Since the exemption was enacted, hydraulic fracturing operations have been linked to contaminated drinking water in communities around the country.

“Legislation to repeal the exemption has recently been introduced in both the House and Senate. Among other things, the legislation would require public disclosure of the chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

“What to do:

“Send a message urging your senators and representative to co-sponsor legislation to repeal the Halliburton Loophole (H.R. 2766/S. 1215).”

So what are the chemicals and toxic poisons used in fracturing fluids? Drillers call it salt water, but I wouldn’t gargle with it if I were you.

Some of that salt water escaped from a gas well in Louisiana recently and, even though drillers say it was 99 percent pure water and only 1 percent fraccing fluid, it killed a bunch of cows.


2 Comments


  1.  
    Independence Day

    Won’t somebody please stick a sock or better yet a grenade in Dick Cheney’s mouth?




  2.  

    Please take this easy action! We all know that Cornyn and Hutchinson will ignore their constituents because their masters are the industry but they still should hear from us.





Leave a Response

(required)


× four = 16