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Latest From Cover
An injection well spills over wetlands in Vienna, Ohio. Courtesy of Protect Mahoning Valley.

Shalefield Stories

Not everything is greener on the other side of the gas patch.
Fort Worth Weekly
When the land men came bearing gas-well leases, nearly all of Fort Worth fell under their spell. The drilling would be a boon to the city, the county, the state. Rigs would be set up and then disappear in no time. Heck, we’d ...
Acosta’s battle against cancer ended in victory; his battle to win the heart of Kaitlyn, not so much. Photo courtesy of Michael Acosta.
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Latest From Blotch
Collin

Top 5 Shows

Steve Steward
1) This list is pretty Saturday heavy, but here’s one for Friday: Collin Herring, Daniel Markham, and Kelsey Lewis at Shipping & Receiving. I’ve probably mentioned how Herring was once the crowned prince of alt-country ...
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Latest From Metro
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Homeless Movie Night

A faith-based nonprofit attempts to bring some normalcy to lives that are anything but.
Erin Ratigan
Kevin McFarland has been living on the streets for three years. He’s tried shelters but doesn’t like them. When he’s not working as a day laborer, he spends most of his time taking care of Monique, his pregnant fiancée, ...
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The wall behind Jim Strachan’s house is falling apart and could cost tens of thousands of dollars to replace. Photo by Jeff Prince.
Zametz: “I’ve found myself to be a connector.” Photo by Eric Griffey.
 
Latest From Music Feature
sally-majestic

New Local Music

Sally Majestic, Mean Motor Scooter, and Doc Strange have new tunes for your earholes.
Fort Worth Weekly
Sally Majestic’s Rate of Exchange Sally Majestic’s new album is interesting. Oh, sure. The musicality and performances are inventive –– the kind of musician’s telepathy acquired by playing with your best friends for 1...
Left Arm Tan’s latest album was inspired by a phone booth ringing in the middle of a desert.
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Latest From Static
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Trap and Release Coming to Hurst?

Static
Hurst advocates of TNR, or trap-neuter-release, a humane approach to controlling feral cat populations, may finally have an ally. Recently appointed by Hurst City Council as the new director of the Hurst Animal Shelter, Amanda ...
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BioBlitz
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Latest From Last Call
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Trailer Park Boys and Girls

Steve Steward
I wouldn’t say my girlfriend is obsessed with Canadian mockumentary series Trailer Park Boys, but when we were watching the show’s main characters, Mr. Lahey and Randy, perform live at The Rail Club last Thursday, she was c...
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Latest From Hearsay
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James Hinkle: Still Ticking

HearSay
(Update below.) First, the good news. Veteran Fort Worth bluesman, painter, and all around great guy James Hinkle is alive. The bad news: His full recovery from emergency heart surgery last week might sidetrack him from a tour ...
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Latest From Stage
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Poe Notes

Fort Worth Opera tackles Edgar Allan with mixed results in Buried Alive and Embedded.
Kristian Lin
Horror is particularly hard to do on the stage. A theater director doesn’t have the editing tricks and CGI available to filmmakers, nor can he or she allow the viewer’s imagination to fill in details the way a prose writer ...
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Though nearly 50 years old, the choreography in Stevenson’s Cinderella still holds up. Photo by Ellen Appel.
Carolyn Judson was wonderful in Texas Ballet Theater’s Classic Combination. Ellen Appel.
 
Latest From Eats
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Staying the Courses

Avanti Ristorante brings its elegant Italian to Fort Worth.
BY LAUREN PHILLIPS
A block or so back from Sundance Square, on the quiet pedestrian plaza between the City Place towers, sits Fort Worth’s own Avanti Ristorante. For more than a quarter-century, Dallas’s original Avanti has anchored Uptown fr...
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The Nutella mousse at Olivella’s was an interesting twist on a classic Italian dessert. Photo by Jordan Ricaurte.
 
Latest From Chow, Baby
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Jesus Returns

Chow, Baby
A few years ago, Chef Jesus Garcia was churning out James Beard Award-caliber fare at Little Lilly Sushi (6100 Camp Bowie Blvd., Ste. 12, 817-989-8886) until he suddenly departed for greener (and wetter) pastures in Seattle. At...
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Latest From Film Reviews
Captain-America

Collateral Damages

The Avengers disassemble in their best movie yet, Captain America: Civil War.
Kristian Lin
The hype over Captain America: Civil War has been washing over us from the fan conventions and the parts of Europe where the movie has already opened. People who snagged an early look at this superhero flick are saying that it...
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Latest From Film Shorts
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Film Shorts

Kristian Lin
Opening The Meddler (PG-13) Susan Sarandon stars in this comedy as a New York widow who visits her daughter (Rose Byrne) in L.A. and tries to fix everything in her life. Also with J.K. Simmons, Jerrod Carmichael, Cecily Strong,...
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Latest From Arts
BuriedAlive_1_Photo-Credit-Marty-Sohl-3

Poe Notes

Fort Worth Opera tackles Edgar Allan with mixed results in Buried Alive and Embedded.
Kristian Lin
Horror is particularly hard to do on the stage. A theater director doesn’t have the editing tricks and CGI available to filmmakers, nor can he or she allow the viewer’s imagination to fill in details the way a prose writer ...
JFK_37_Photo-Credit-Karen-Almond-1
Thomas Hart Benton’s “Shipping Out” features the face of John Paxton, father of Fort Worth-born actor Bill Paxton. The painting, now on display at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art, sold in 2014 at a Christie’s auction for more than $1 million. Private collection, Photo by Chip Cooper.
Dennis Farris spends his days photographing, painting, and discovering Mother Nature while making more than a pretty penny. The 51-year-old Kansas City native and his wife ViVi share a two-acre lot in East Fort Worth that includes a large house, a swimming pool, and a small house that Farris doubles as his art studio.
He said he paints about one piece per week. Sometimes aFarris’ paintings sell fast.
His bestsellers are of mountains, rivers, and Texas nature, such as longhorns and fields of flowers.
Farris’ paintings sell from around $3,000 to $100,000.
“Art sales are unpredictable at best,” he said. “You might sell 10 pieces one month and then go two or three months without selling anything.”
Farris began drawing as far back as he can remember.
“My sister and I would draw together, and at school we would compete with other students to see who could draw the best,” Farris recalled. “All through elementary and into high school, I took art, and all the kids I used to compete with were all still there, so I figured that art is something that people are genetically inclined to do.” 
After earning his BFA from Central Missouri State University in 1987, Farris moved to Fort Worth in 1989 to work as a freelance commercial artist. He worked with Phillips Agency, Mrs. Baird’s Bread, Miller Brewery, Shakespeare in the Park, and many others, until 2000, when he married. His wife had a good job with Lhoist, a global mineral and lime producer, so Farris jumped from the commercial art industry into the fine arts. 
“It’s a little riskier to paint what you like,” he said. “In commercial art, they pay you more, but they tell you what to paint. In the fine art world, you can paint an image that means something to you. I have found more joy in the fine arts.”
Although Farris paints mostly from the comfort of home, he also has been a National Parks and Wildlife Service artist in residence. At Zion National Park in 2010 and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon in 2012, Farris lived for free for a month at a time to paint the landscape and perform outreach. The images that he doesn’t have time to paint en plein air, he captures with his camera. When he returns home, he sorts through the photos and paints from them. Painters may get only one hour to paint a nature scene before the light changes, he said. 
While at Zion, he stayed in a refurbished 1928 stone cabin located in the middle of the park. 
“I got snowed in a couple of times, and I was by myself,” he said. “It was so quiet and beautiful and awesome that I will never forget how peaceful it felt.” 
Along with painting longhorns, rivers, and natural scenery, Farris has been volunteering at Hangman’s House of Horrors for the past 27 years.
D’Ann Dagen, Hangman’s founder and former producer, knows him well.
“Almost three decades ago, I met a young Dennis Farris who volunteered to help birth our charity haunted house,” Dagen said. “He not only drew and painted the iconic Hangman character, he composed the storyline of how the Hangman became legend. Additionally, [Farris] designed the posters and t-shirts promoting the event.
“Over the years,” she continued, “I’ve witnessed [Farris] exhibit tremendous growth, both emotionally and spiritually, as an artist and as a man. He personifies talent, intellect, and integrity. If you want to start a Dennis Farris Fan Club, please allow me to serve as president.”
Farris’ paintings are currently on exhibit in galleries in Santa Fe and at Artspace 111. And online at farrisart.com.
“The art gallery world is in flux right now,” Farris said. “With so much art selling online, brick-and-mortar studios are having trouble staying open.”
Farris does not sell his paintings online, but he’s active on Facebook, using the social media platform “to get visibility,” he said.
Farris explained that the key to selling is to get the art in front of people. The more people see it, the more chance that one will feel emotionally attached to it and pull out his or her wallet. Art is personal. People have to identify with it somehow. 
“Buying art is a total frill,” Farris said. “It’s not like buying toilet paper or toothpaste that you have to have. It is something that you buy with total disposable income. It is not something they need but something they want.” 
Farris will continue his journey as an artist in residence this summer in East Texas at Guadalupe National Park. Photo by Ryan Grounds.
 
Latest From Gallery
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Gallery

Fort Worth Weekly
Fort Worth Community Arts Center opens another slate of shows this week just in time for the summer, with particular emphasis on Omisade Amy Gerhauser’s environmental art and Jave Gakumei Yoshimoto’s anime-influenced scroll...
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Latest From Listen Up
Life-Ain't-Hard

Luke McGlathery

Life Ain’t Hard (Self-released)
Jasun Lee
Luke McGlathery has been a musical pillar around Fort Worth for the past few years. Whether it’s with his former bluegrass outfit Big City Folk, hosting weekly open-mic nights at Lola’s Saloon, or grabbing his violin and ho...
tony-Ferraro
Fort Worth pop-jazz-blues singer-songwriter D. Anson Brody will release a song a week for a year.