Cover
001-C-FWWEEKLY_03_11_15

Fault Lines

There’s nothing theoretical about the damages that earthquakes are causing for North Texas homeowners, cities, and businesses.
Peter Gorman
The first time Cathy Wallace felt an earthquake was last Dec. 15. She was sitting with her husband in their Irving home discussing retirement when “the whole house started swaying,” she said. She thought the house might col...


cover

Banking on the Poor

A Dallas nonprofit’s legal battles could change affordable housing programs nationwide.
Gayle Reaves
In the early 1980s, Dallas civil rights attorney Mike Daniel and his law partner Betsy Julian were fighting to desegregate public housing in East Texas. At The Dallas Morning News, two reporters read the horror stories about pu...



001-C-FWWEEKLY_02_25_15

BLOOD on Whose Hands?

Family and friends want to know how Daniel Brumley died at a simple traffic stop.
Jeff Prince
At a time when outrage over the frequency of police shootings is growing regionally and nationally, the killing of Daniel Brumley on a brisk morning last month in Fort Worth passed by with barely a ripple. The Star-Telegram pri...


001-C-FWWEEKLY_02_18_15

A Shift in Thinking

Grand Prairie citizens’ complaints about drilling near dams has led to a national study.
Eric Griffey
One morning in the summer of 2010, Rosemary Reed awoke to her house shaking and the sound of engines screeching so loudly that it sounded like her backyard had been turned into a Motocross track. When she looked out a back wind...



001-C-FWWEEKLY_02_11_15

A History of Violence

From Abe Lincoln to John Wesley Hardin’s shot-up playing card, Don Dow’s collections centered on violent ends.
Jeff Prince
The big cardboard box filled with dusty books hypnotized Don Dow. He’d become temporarily separated from his family on the town square in Santa Fe, New Mexico, while on a vacation in 1963. Dow ended up in a bookstore. Always ...


Habits on Horseback

Habits on Horseback

A South Texas rodeo queen became a hardworking nun, educating children from California to Tanzania.
Karen Gavis
A swanky Western jacket hung nearby as Sister Camella Menotti, 84, thumbed through a folder filled with old photographs and newspaper clippings. “We’re supposed to keep stuff like this. We put it out when we die. We have a ...



Fort Worth Weekly 01-28-15

A Short, Wild Ride

The Where House closes its doors on five years of wheels-off partying.
STEVE STEWARD
In the midst of the last show at The Where House, I looked around the room and tried to make sense of everything going on around me. This was two weeks ago, so my memory is fuzzy, but I recall watching Telegraph Canyon playing ...


01.21.15-WACT

Tricky Therapy

A Weatherford drama school teaches more than just acting.
KRISTIAN LIN W/ PHOTOS BY MEI-CHUN JAU
They don’t waste any time at the Weatherford Acting, Film, and Stunt Academy, known as WACT. When I pay my first visit there on a frigid evening in January, I’m immediately directed to a seat on stage. I’m there to interv...



Cover-1.14.15

Open Scary

A murderer, a call for an armed march on Washington, and aggressive confrontations with police — what’s to worry about with Open Carry Tarrant County?
CHRISTIAN MCPHATE W/ PHOTOS BY VISHAL MALHOTRA
The masked gunman paces in front of the government building wearing black coveralls and a white ski mask. A large man, he towers over the other armed supporters waiting patiently for their leader to determine their next move. H...


Cover-1-7-15

Opening the Door to Polluters

Texas regulators have been weakening the state’s chemical exposure rules for years.
LISA SONG AND ROSALIND ADAMS
In 2007, Texas regulators quietly relaxed the state’s long-term air-pollution guideline for benzene, one of the world’s most toxic and thoroughly studied chemicals. The number they came up with, still in effect, was 40 perc...