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Larry Joe Taylor

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The guy who coined “coastal-and-western” has learned a thing through the years.


The Von Ehrics

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If you listen to any Dropkick Murphys album, you get a sense that Boston, their hometown, is largely made up of blue-collar punks who are as enamored with their union cards as they are of Guinness pints. There are plenty of Yan...



Various Artists

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Taking its name from revolutionary rebels in Nicaragua, Sandinista!, The Clash’s groundbreaking album from 1980, is “an exciting, sprawling mess,” according to writer Jimmy Guterman, who put together The Sandinista! Proje...


Watermelon Slim & the Workers

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Watermelon Slim is an ex-reporter, ex-sanitation truck driver, ex-lots-of-jobs bluesman and Vietnam vet who quit the “real world” after a heart attack in 2002 to play the blues all the time.



Oliver Future

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Oliver Future maybe may be the hardest-working unsigned band around. They’ve committed themselves to the stage, the road, and the studio as ferociously as groups and performers with 10 times the budget and resources.


Various artists Duets: A Prairie Home Companion

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Prairie Home Companion is such a good radio show that you’d expect songs from the show to be special too. But the choices on Duets: A Prairie Home Companion and When I Get Home — Songs are, as a whole, ordinary. Recorded di...



Anjani

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“There’s perfume burning in the air / Bits of beauty everywhere,” sings jazz pianist-vocalist Anjani on the opener to Blue Alert, her third album. “Shrapnel flying / Soldier hit the dirt / She comes so close, you feel h...


John Denver

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John Denver was a consistently — some would say mercilessly — sweet and upbeat-sounding performer, even on his sad songs.



Modest Mouse

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Modest Mouse frontman Isaac Brock is probably the most unassuming hero in modern rock, an idea he wouldn’t scoff at but would more than likely shrug off in silent bewilderment.


The Broken West

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Somewhere in the atom-splitting genre distinctions that music critics like to confer, it got lost that pop can be punk and punk can be exuberant.