Music

Charles Mingus Sextet with Eric Dolphy

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The simply titled Cornell 1964 is one of the previously undiscovered gems from the too-short career of jazz genius composer, arranger, and bass player Charles Mingus. This first-time release, recorded March 18, 1964, at the New...


Red Dirt, Red bud, Red eyes

Hearsay
Cross Canadian Ragweed embodies the “weed, whites, and wine” lifestyle of the Red Dirt-Texas Music practitioners, but apparently Cody Canada and his gang aren’t as stoned as they look.



The House that Blue Built

The debut album by young, veteran slinger-singer Drue Webber goes deep.
CAROLINE COLLIER
A 12-year veteran of the local blues scene, Fort Worth singer-songwriter Drue Webber has finally released a solo album.


Jon Spencer & Matt Verta-Ray

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Recorded in three cities with three different backing bands, Going Way Out With Heavy Trash is Jon Spencer and Matt Verta-Ray’s tribute to the roots of rockabilly.



Portugal. The Man

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“Sell me / I’m a skeptical boy.” So opens Church Mouth, the second album by Alaska’s Portugal. The Man.


Dee Dee Bridgewater

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Dee Dee Bridgewater’s Red Earth: A Malian Journey is a masterful mix of American jazz, traditional African songs and sounds, and improvisation that documents her journey “home.” The album gets toes tapping while simultane...



Spoon

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Britt Daniel has a broken heart. His band Spoon’s lengthy catalog of masterfully crafted pop-rock songs are proof that the man at the helm has been burned a time or two.


And Another Thing …

Prolific singer-songwriter James Michael Taylor has something to say. Dammit.
ANTHONY MARIANI
Little Rooster wasn’t a hero. He was a small-town constable who always wanted to play cop.



The Fellow Americans

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From the opening riff on Search for Numb, it’s obvious that The Fellow Americans aren’t interested in fancy production tricks or endless sonic nuances. The Fort Worth band simply rocks.


Ollie-vah!

Hearsay
From the WTF? Department. Though hardly recognized as a source of insightful music criticism, Esquire magazine is still one of the best-written publications ever.