Music

Spune on 6th

Hearsay
For the past four years, Spune Productions has been in the vanguard of hip music in the Metroplex. A ton of cool indie bands that have been written about in hipster bibles like SPIN and Pitchfork Media have come through the reg...


Various artists

Stax 50th Anniversary Celebration (Stax Records/Concord Music Group)
Listen Up
While Motown was getting a lot of well-deserved glory for its soul music successes in the 1960s and ’70s, Stax was in the trenches digging up and sharing funky, Southern-rooted, R&B-based soul. The label put 243 songs on...



Ben Kweller

The Show
Had Ben Kweller been alive and making music during the ‘70s, he would have made a killing writing theme songs for classic television shows.


Don’t Bring ‘Momma’ to SXSW

Hearsay
There are just some neo-traditional country songs that have “classic” written all over them, and Jerrod Niemann’s “I Love Women (My Momma Can’t Stand)” is one.



Johnny Cash

Listen Up
As a rockabilly pioneer, Johnny Cash sang what some people called the devil’s music.


Cool and No Gang

One-man blue-eyed soul band Browningham is back, and once again, he’s black.
ANTHONY MARIANI
Incredibly, there are a lot of scenesters here who have no idea who Nathan Brown is. None!



South-by, New Ealey

Hearsay
The four Fort Worth bands selected to play sanctioned showcases at SXSW next month aren’t any surprise: Best Fwends, Bosque Brown, The Rocket Summer, and The Theater Fire. They’ve all played the annual music festiva...


Sunny Sweeney

Listen Up
It was last fall when Sunny Sweeney’s self-produced debut c.d. first arrived in the mail. Not that it was particularly momentous.



Blood of the Sun

Listen Up
Blood of the Sun is a new local band, built from the spare parts of Sourvein, Storm at Sunrise, Rotting Corpse, and a couple of other hard North Texas groups.


Ascension

One Fort Worth jazz legend leaves behind a legacy, the other a legacy and a stack of records.
ANTHONY MARIANI
For years, monster jazz pianist Jhon Kahsen and drummer Duane Durrett have watched fellow North Texas jazzbos retire peacefully, almost too peacefully, to the Great Hereafter.