Posts Tagged ‘beethoven’
David Courcheron plays with FWSO’s Classical Masters Festival. Photo by Jeff Roffman.

Mostly Mozart

Fort Worth Weekly
We all know classical music as what’s traditionally played in the concert hall as opposed to clubs or stadiums, but Classical music (with a capital “c”) is specific to Western music written in the 18th and early 19th cent...

Purple Piano Texas

The annual TCU workshop/festival featured some of the best playing you’ll hear all year.
For 30 years now, one of the most ambitious and popular extracurricular programs at Texas Christian University has been the annual Piano Texas International Academy and Festival. Every year, the intensive month-long music camp ...

A Lone Star at Piano Texas

Cheng Zhang stood out in the always-pleasing annual TCU festival.
A classical music star was born last week at the final concert of the Piano Texas Festival in TCU’s Ed Landreth Auditorium. If one performance of one concerto is a reliable yardstick, 20-year-old Cheng Zhang’s journey throu...

Midori and Tsujii

Fresh from its recent all-Beethoven Festival, the Fort Worth Symphony begins its regular subscription series this weekend with Japanese violinist Midori as soloist. A one-time child prodigy (she debuted with the New York Philha...

For Hands

Leonard Eureka
Beethoven fans should be flocking to Bass Performance Hall this weekend for the Fort Worth Symphony’s three-day festival saluting the popular German composer. A different symphony will be heard each night: the Third, R...

Gilmore Girl

Big Ticket
The last great pianist from the country of Argentina was Martha Argerich, the sultry, eccentric, reclusive, unpredictable keyboard wizard who lit up the 1960s and ’70s with her volcanic musicianship.

Flights of Fancy

Van Cliburn gold medalist Alexander Kobrin brought an inquisitive, authoritative touch to some semi-obscure music at the Caruth last weekend.
The Van Cliburn International Piano Competition has sifted through a lot of talent over the years, with most winners falling somewhere between the scholarly intensity of Radu Lupu and the sweeping romanticism of Olga Kern. But ...