Posts Tagged ‘contemporary’

Gallery

William Campbell
Gallery
New Mexico-based Kevin Tolman expresses his love of abstract art through acrylic paint and mixed media on large canvases. These warm, airy, colorful works have been wildly popular in his adopted home state, and now they’ve fo...


Gallery

Richard Thompson
Gallery
Richard Thompson is a familiar name to habitués of William Campbell Contemporary Art, but he has gone off his trout obsession from recent years. Instead, his current show pursues a theme of what seem to be glass vessels placed...



Gallery

Gallery
Isn’t it great that Fort Worth Weekly has started running these Gallery pictures in color?


Gallery

James Blake
Gallery
William Campbell Contemporary Art changes things up with its show of James Blake’s delicately beautiful black-and-white drawings of trees and flowers.



Gallery

Cecil Touchon
Gallery
Cecil Touchon’s show at William Campbell is fired by the idea that new styles and trends have swept the art world so fast that we haven’t been able to keep up.


Gallery

Randall Reid
Gallery
Fort Worth native Randall Reid’s mixed-media works make heavy use of distressed materials, frames within frames, and found objects to create abstract studies in texture and color. His show at William Campbell is up through th...



Gallery

Gallery
Birds painted in an Audubon-like realistic style would be too straightforward for a venue like William Campbell Contemporary Art. Fortunately, Billy Hassell’s renditions of birds are sharp, stylized, and brightly colored ...


Gallery

Gallery
Destined to be Hank Hill’s least favorite art show, Death of a Propane Salesman is all about anxiety, and is there ever a lot of it in Lawrence Lee’s picture of a crazed horse or Seth Alverson’s apocalyptic ta...



Gallery

Gallery
This week marks the 35th anniversary of the founding of William Campbell Contemporary Art. The official celebration won’t be until next month, but you can still mark the occasion by catching the gallery’s current ex...


To the Max

JIMMY FOWLER
What you’ll probably notice about writer-director Spike Jonze’s long-anticipated Where the Wild Things Are is that a lot is missing: cheap pop-culture references, self-conscious meta jokes about children’s mov...