Posts Tagged ‘read’
daviddow

Voluminous

In his new book, Houston law professor David Dow bites off more than he can chew.
JIMMY FOWLER
University of Houston law professor and anti-death penalty crusader David Dow made a big noise in 2010 with his first book, The Autobiography of an Execution. In it, Dow took a highly personal look at the stressful, morally com...


Dear Chow, Baby

Editor’s note: Despite Christy Goldfinch’s departure from the role, Chow, Baby goes on. See page 27 for this week’s column.
John Q. Reader
Oh no. Say it isn’t so. I’m very disappointed. Having kicked my weekend off with your column for years now, I will miss my Chow, Baby very much. Once I even went to an Asian place on East Berry Street called “Ho” becaus...



You’re in the Gummint Now

An open letter to freshman legislators.
DAVE MCNEELY
Dear freshman Texas legislators: Welcome, you 37 new state representatives and two new senators who’ve never been through a session of the Texas Legislature. You’re in for 140 of the most exciting and exhausting days of you...


Irk Edition

Last Call
So there’s this other weekly paper in town. It’s called DFW.com: Ink Edition, and it covers entertainment. If it strikes you as odd that an actual paper is a supplement to a web site — the stories that run in ...



The Weekly’s LSIFF Blog

Weekly bloggers
Read the Weekly’s coverage of the third annual Lone Star International Film Festival here!


Local Heroes? Who’d Know?

DAN MCGRAW
Since I was a little kid, I’ve always read the sports section of the daily newspaper before anything else. When I was a newspaper carrier, I would get my bundle on the corner, pull out the sports, and sit on that bundle u...



Well Drilled

Remarkable as There Will Be Blood often is, our film critic refuses to gush.
Kristian Lin
I did something unusual while preparing to write my review of There Will Be Blood: I read everybody else’s reviews.


Travel and No Leisure

Kultur
Interstate 35 might not have the hipster cachet of Route 66 or Ventura Highway, but the 1,568-mile road that stretches from Laredo to Duluth, Minn., and cuts through many major Lone Star cities is paved with as much history.