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Childs: “There’s such an emphasis on country, folk, and singer-songwriter guitarists, it’s easy [for electronic artists] to get lost in the background.” Courtesy the artist

After arriving fully formed on the scene in 2021 with the electro-country track “Tarrant County,” G.W. Childs signed with COP International (Stabbing Westward, Chiasm), the German label run by producer John Fryer (Nine Inch Nails, Depeche Mode, Dead Can Dance, Cocteau Twins). “International” certainly suits the 50-year-old Fort Worth father of two young boys — the title track to Childs’ 2023 album You Don’t Know landed in the Top 10 in German radio’s Deutsch Alternative Chart.

“As someone who’s been performing electronic music for many years, I’m used to it,” Childs said about his overseas attention. “Germany and Europe, in my experience, have always been more attracted to electronic music. They even play it in the gas stations and grocery stores. Because it’s more indie, underground, it’s harder over here to find places that will book you and a platform that will spin your music. There’s such an emphasis on country, folk, and singer-songwriter guitarists, it’s easy to get lost in the background.”

Childs: “Because my sons did play such a huge role in [Spectrum], I hope talking about it gives other parents ideas for co-creation with their kids.”
Courtesy the artist
Before releasing Spectrum, Childs also put out several singles and EPs plus the 2023 album. In keeping with everything that the term “spectrum” implies, Childs’ new 10-track offering is indeed kaleidoscopic.

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“When I sing,” he said, “I come off with a drawl, and it comes off as country with whatever I do in some form. I’ve described the album as The Eagles meets Kraftwerk with a Beck and Beastie Boys influence.”

The songs are titled after the colors of the rainbow along with “Gold” and “Silver.” They also speak directly to Childs’ synesthesia, the ability to see sounds as color. Sonically, Spectrum features hints of breakbeat and house music, kind of like what you’d hear at a goth dance club, Childs said.

As an international artist, Childs has been doing the press rounds. He’s spoken with a few publications and podcasts across the U.K. and even some in the states, like Modsnap radio out of Hawaii.

“It’s wonderful to get to explain the idea behind Spectrum and to talk about the nuances and stories that evolved through its creation,” Childs said. “Because my sons did play such a huge role in it, I hope talking about it gives other parents ideas for co-creation with their kids, because it’s magical to experience them when they are being a partner in creation rather than a witness.”

Despite his international profile, Childs hasn’t been all Spectrum all the time. Along with parenting George and Phoenix and working with the Recording Connection in Los Angeles, a school for which he’s written several curricula about electronic music, he’s also been looking local. Having worked with country singer-songwriter Joe Savage and awesome electro duo Starbass Laboratories, Childs wants to dive deeper into the Fort Worth/North Texas scene.

“I think once [electronic music] is received, it would open up some very cool shows — not just for me, but to get some very interesting bills going with additional electronic artists.”

Basically, he’s dying to rock his keytar onstage everywhere.

“I am enjoying and looking forward to more adventures in fatherhood,” he said. “I find a lot of joy with my sons. I am looking forward to playing live, locally and abroad. I’m looking forward to more recording, more writing, and putting out albums. I’ve got a lot of songs written at this point that I’m excited to share. I’m looking forward to finishing the music videos for Spectrum. I’m looking forward to teaching more.”

Childs: “I’ve described the album as The Eagles meets Kraftwerk with a Beck and Beastie Boys influence.”
Album art by the artist, Christian Petke, and AI

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